Spring Fellows Workshop to showcase work on Afterlives

Mon, 05/09/2022

"At stake in afterlives is, then, not only what lives on, but how such ‘living on’ occurs – its modalities, mechanisms, processes, and translations – in which something both recognizable and new, ongoing and ‘eventful,’ persistent and epochal is at work. Thus, we are interested in not only the afterlives of artistic movements, historical periods, literary styles, economic orders, political regimes, and religious institutions, but also how such afterlives are possible in the first place. What structures and enables (pragmatically, imaginatively) the afterlife of events, ideas, and institutions? What needs to take place for something truly new to emerge?"

Join this year's cohort of Fellows for three panel discussions on the 2021-22 focal theme of Afterlives. Each presentation will be followed by a Q&A, and the entire event is open to the Cornell community.

What? Afterlives Fellows Workshop
Where? The A.D. White House
When? Wednesday, May 11, 10:30am-5pm (panels all day!)

Papers to be presented at the Fellows conference including "Dignity Archives: An Ecology of Crip Sensoriality, Anti-confinement and Necro-activisms," "Crisálida: Memory, Materiality, and Loss in the Venezuelan Diaspora," and "The Survival of a People: Afro-Boricua Afterlives & Afterimages" among others.

The Society's 2021-22 programming has been organized around the focal theme of "Afterlives," culminating in this year's Workshop as a time for Fellows to share their findings, connect with each other, and the broader Cornell community.

“Academic work is never done in isolation, even when, as in the humanities, it requires substantial time alone in archives or simply at the desk,” said Paul Fleming, Taylor Family Director of the Society for the Humanities. “It is essential that ideas travel, and the Society for the Humanities is a central hub for this transference of ideas.”

Click to view the entire schedule. Refreshments will be provided throughout the day.

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